Home » Dear America, Why I Turned Against Communism, The Odyssey of an American Communist Youth Who Miraculously Survived the Harsh Labor Camps of Kolyma, Siberia by Tomas Sgovio
Dear America, Why I Turned Against Communism, The Odyssey of an American Communist Youth Who Miraculously Survived the Harsh Labor Camps of Kolyma, Siberia Tomas Sgovio

Dear America, Why I Turned Against Communism, The Odyssey of an American Communist Youth Who Miraculously Survived the Harsh Labor Camps of Kolyma, Siberia

Tomas Sgovio

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ISBN :
Paperback
297 pages
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 About the Book 

Thomas Sgovio did not intend this book to be just another account of Soviet prisons and labor camps - instead, a journey through human experience ... his transformation from a communist, atheist child born in the revolutionary movement - into aMoreThomas Sgovio did not intend this book to be just another account of Soviet prisons and labor camps - instead, a journey through human experience ... his transformation from a communist, atheist child born in the revolutionary movement - into a God-fearing Christian.His first attempt to leave the Soviet Union resulted in two long, continuous journeys of prisons, transports, concentration labor camps, and finally exile. It all started in 1938 when Sgovio was arrested by two NKVD agents after he left the United States Embassy in Moscow. Not until 1960, twenty-two years later, did he finally succeed in extricating himself from a captivity into which he had unwittingly blundered.This book covers the periods of Sgovios childhood and youth in Buffalo, New York: his fathers involvement in the American revolutionary movement ultimately resulting in his deportation as an undesirable alien- Thomass fathers early days in Moscow- the events leading to the arrest of his father and himself- Sgovios fathers death in Moscow after ten years in the labor camps- and finally ... his many years in that frozen hell called Kolyma.Since 1932 millions of prisoners were sent to die in Kolyma, the vast penal territory of the NKVD. To this day there are prisoners suffering there. And still, the overwhelming majority of Americans have never heard of Kolyma.The events and names in this book are authentic, excepting for the names of five persons. In all cases he has indicated in the passages that he did not recall their names and gave them fictitious first names for conveniences sake.Thomas Sgovio has identified a few others with initials for personal reasons - to protect the innocent.